Non-contact devices put into use to reduce risk of cross-infection

Updated:Mar 10,2020 09:30 AM Xinhua

A staff member packs a non-contact self-service machine at the Anhui Easpeed Technology Co. in Hefei, east China's Anhui Province, March 9, 2020. A number of non-contact self-service machines and non-contact elevator buttons have been put into use in many hospitals and office buildings in the city to help reduce the risk of cross-infection in public areas. These devices, taking advantage of a kind of interactive holographic air cast imaging technology, can project elevator buttons and operation interface of self-service machines into the air to enable users to complete operation without touching the real objects. (Photo by Zhou Mu/Xinhua)

A staff member adjusts a non-contact self-service machine at the Anhui Easpeed Technology Co. in Hefei, east China's Anhui Province, March 9, 2020. A number of non-contact self-service machines and non-contact elevator buttons have been put into use in many hospitals and office buildings in the city to help reduce the risk of cross-infection in public areas. These devices, taking advantage of a kind of interactive holographic air cast imaging technology, can project elevator buttons and operation interface of self-service machines into the air to enable users to complete operation without touching the real objects. (Photo by Zhou Mu/Xinhua)

A staff member adjusts a non-contact self-service machine at the Anhui Easpeed Technology Co. in Hefei, east China's Anhui Province, March 9, 2020. A number of non-contact self-service machines and non-contact elevator buttons have been put into use in many hospitals and office buildings in the city to help reduce the risk of cross-infection in public areas. These devices, taking advantage of a kind of interactive holographic air cast imaging technology, can project elevator buttons and operation interface of self-service machines into the air to enable users to complete operation without touching the real objects. (Photo by Zhou Mu/Xinhua)

A person uses non-contact buttons to operate an elevator at the First Affiliated Hospital of University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei, east China's Anhui Province, March 9, 2020. A number of non-contact self-service machines and non-contact elevator buttons have been put into use in many hospitals and office buildings in the city to help reduce the risk of cross-infection in public areas. These devices, taking advantage of a kind of interactive holographic air cast imaging technology, can project elevator buttons and operation interface of self-service machines into the air to enable users to complete operation without touching the real objects. (Photo by Zhou Mu/Xinhua)

A person uses non-contact buttons to operate an elevator at the First Affiliated Hospital of University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei, east China's Anhui Province, March 9, 2020. A number of non-contact self-service machines and non-contact elevator buttons have been put into use in many hospitals and office buildings in the city to help reduce the risk of cross-infection in public areas. These devices, taking advantage of a kind of interactive holographic air cast imaging technology, can project elevator buttons and operation interface of self-service machines into the air to enable users to complete operation without touching the real objects. (Photo by Zhou Mu/Xinhua)

A patient uses a non-contact self-service machine at the First Affiliated Hospital of University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei, east China's Anhui Province, March 9, 2020. A number of non-contact self-service machines and non-contact elevator buttons have been put into use in many hospitals and office buildings in the city to help reduce the risk of cross-infection in public areas. These devices, taking advantage of a kind of interactive holographic air cast imaging technology, can project elevator buttons and operation interface of self-service machines into the air to enable users to complete operation without touching the real objects. (Photo by Zhou Mu/Xinhua)